Printed on: 03/08/2021. Please go to http://policy.umn.edu for the most current version of the Policy or related document.
University of Minnisota  FAQ

Supportive Measures

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Who can I call for help? Are there any confidential resources available to me? 

    The following resources offer free and confidential services, including advocacy, counseling, and emotional support.

    Crookston Campus Polk County Coordinated Victim Services (complainant resource) 218-281-1554
    800-524-1993
     
    UMC Counseling Center 218-281-8571
    218-281-8348
     
    Student Health 218-281-8512  
    Duluth Campus Women’s Resource and Action Center 218-726-6292  
    Program for Aid to Victims of Sexual Assault (complainant resource) 218-726-1931  
    Counseling: Health Services 218-726-7913  
    Morris Campus Someplace Safe (complainant resource) 800-974-3359  
    Student Counseling 320-589-6060  
    Rochester Campus Crisis Hotline 507-269-4511  
    Student Counseling 507-258-8017 rkotovic@r.umn.edu
    Student Health Services 507-292-7250  
    Twin Cities Campus The Aurora Center (complainant resource) 24 Hour Helpline:
    612-626-9111
    Office Line:
    612-626-2929
    aurora@umn.edu
    Boynton Mental Health Office line:
    612-625-8400
    24 hour Crisis Connection counselors:
    612-301-4673
     
    Student Counseling Services 612-624-3323 counseling@umn.edu

    The University’s Employee Assistance Program (EAP) is available to benefits-eligible employees on all system campuses.  EAP provides confidential, professional consultation and referral services to address any personal or work concern that may be affecting one’s wellbeing.   EAP can be reached at 612-625-2820, 1-888-243-5744 or eap@umn.edu.

  2. Can the University provide me with supportive measures? What about my housing situation and my classes?

    Yes.  All parties can request supportive measures from the University that are designed to promote their safety, well-being and continued access to employment and educational programs and activities.  Possible supportive measures include, but are not limited to: residence modifications, academic modifications, work schedule or location modifications, and support and counseling.  For example, you can request to change your living situation or to reschedule an exam or assignment.

    All parties can request these supportive measures by contacting the campus Title IX office, campus personal support resources or by contacting the departments or individuals with the ability to provide the requested accommodations, such as the campus housing and residential life office, the appropriate faculty member, or a supervisor.[1]

    Complainants can request and receive supportive measures even if they choose not to initiate a grievance process.

  3. Can the University move a respondent from a class or residence hall room as a supportive measure for the complainant during an investigation?

    The University cannot implement supportive measures for a complainant that unreasonably burden a respondent unless a final decision has been made that the respondent violated this policy.  Except in rare circumstances, requiring a respondent to move residence halls or classes constitutes an unreasonable burden.  Still, at a complainant’s request, the University can generally move a complainant from a class or residence hall as a supportive measure.

  4. I am an employee respondent. Can the University move me from my position during an investigation as a supportive measure for the complainant or for other reasons?

    Yes.  In some cases, the University Authority identified in Appendix B may take interim measures such as changing a respondent's work responsibilities or work location or placing them on paid leave during a grievance process. Such action may be appropriate when there is a legitimate concern that without such measures: 1) the respondent will engage in prohibited conduct while the grievance process is ongoing, or 2) the respondent would be unduly disruptive to University members or University activities or programs.   

  5. I am a complainant. How do I get a Personal Protection Order?

    Advocates at the various campus personal support resources for complainants can assist you in completing an application for Personal Protection Orders and with other safety planning.

  6. I have been asked to provide supportive measures to a complainant or a respondent. What are my obligations?

    The University is required by policy and federal regulations to provide supportive measures to complainants and respondents. Supportive measures are individualized services provided to: 1) restore or preserve equal access to University programs and activities, 2) protect the safety of the parties or educational environment, and/or 3) deter sexual misconduct. Supportive measures are non-disciplinary and non-punitive services, and must not unreasonably burden another party.

    Supportive measures should be provided to complainants and respondents as appropriate and reasonably available. The departments or individuals with the ability to provide the requested supportive measures are responsible for determining which supportive measures to take depending on the circumstances of each case. Information about supportive measures provided to respondents or complainants should be kept confidential, and should not be shared with others who do not have a need to know.

    Departments or individuals who believe they cannot provide a student's requested supportive measures are advised to consult with campus personal support resources and/or their administrative leadership or supervisor about what other supportive measures might be appropriate and reasonably available. Departments or individuals should consult with the campus Title IX office before denying supportive measures to a student.

    Departments or individuals who believe they cannot provide an employee's requested supportive measures are advised to consult with the campus personal support resources (for complainants), Human Resources (for complainants or respondents), and/or their administrative leadership or supervisor about what other supportive measures might be appropriate and reasonably available. Departments or individuals should consult with the campus Title IX office before denying supportive measures to an employee.

    A failure to provide supportive measures to a complainant or respondent that is clearly unreasonable in light of the known circumstances will violate federal Title IX regulations.

 [1] On the Twin Cities campus, The Aurora Center is also available to assist complainants in requesting and obtaining supportive measures. The Student Advocate Services Office is also available to assist student respondents in requesting and obtaining supportive measures.

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